Shadow (dariaphoebe) wrote,
Shadow
dariaphoebe

He worked night-shift at the opera

Last night I saw Quantum Theater's production of "The Voluptuous Tango" in the 2nd floor auditorium at Mellon Institute (I didn't even know there was one) after a stop at the social mixer next to Craig St Coffee beforehand. A good show; I think I liked "Human Chair" better, thought that was definitely creepier.

Interesting, though, is the curse of context. The interplay between the actors playing Marinetti and Duncan (and the dancers who are miming in context with the plot, so to speak) becomes at certain points sexually suggestive, but I actually found myself drawn by a plotline where in response to the meat proffered by Marinetti (who is making a dinner for Duncan) she replies that she's a vegetarian, that meat gives a taste for blood, and leads to war.

Here I jumped off to some reading I had done earlier in the week on the Spanish Civil War (triggered by this picture in Slate) and despaired for society. Consider that this war presaged World War 2 in some respects, but the west was oblivious or derelict in seeing it; The rightists, soon mainly the fascists, took up arms against the socialist-led government of the country which initially allied with the Communists and the anarchists, as well as Basque and Catalan who hoped for independence; Most of Europe joined a neutrality pact, with only Italy and Germany helping the rebels, and eventually Russia the government. Who are your enemies? The Iron Curtain is gone, but not all socialism is Communism, nor vice versa. Yet the Spaniards stood nearly alone, and fell to 37 years of Franco's Fascist dictatorship.

I have spent perhaps too much time recently reading of foreign wars and American foreign policy (one in particular was Carter's interaction with Iran, with the "shoulder angel" Cyrus Vance and the "shoulder devil" Zbigniew Brzezinski) and wondering to what extent foreign policy continuity across administrations is responsible for sadness, and to what extent each administration is responsible. Our involvement in Vietnam spanned several administrations of both parties, and involved alliances with all sorts of filthy business. The danger of too much power seems to often be not that it will be exercised in a knowingly malignant manner, but in one which ultimately turns out to have been horribly misguided.
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