Shadow (dariaphoebe) wrote,
Shadow
dariaphoebe

I pulled the bike alongside the curb, tilted it to the side to mount it, hit the button to start my fitness tracker, and then started riding. A few blocks later, I shifted down to begin my ride up the hill... and suddenly I was pushing the chain against nothing.

Every day, weather permitting, my base ride is out the door, and up the hill. 430 vertical feet (and just over a mile) later, I usually feel good enough to continue, and one variant I've done a few times recently includes another 600 feet of climbing over another nearly-8 miles. It's therapeutic. It's sanity.

Today, however, I was taking the bike out after having the tube replaced the previous evening due to an unexpected flat that had forced me onto a backup bike for the previous day's ride. Apparently the process had thrown off the alignment of the rear derailleur, and so instead of the lowest gear, the chain was now against the axle, next to the spokes, doing nothing. I just wanted this to be fixed. I had enough other problems; I didn't need one more. And it was Sunday: the bike shop was closed. I couldn't even just delay a bit and expect things to get any better.

Pulling so I was pointed flat, at an angle to the street, I futzed for a moment and got the bike into the next-lowest gear. It wouldn't stay there: I had to snug my hand on the shifter to prevent it from snapping to its index point. But when what you have is stricken, you adapt. Up the hill, albeit with a little more caution than usual. Further along and down and up some of the backside hills. When I got home, the numbers told the tale: 700 vertical feet, 8 miles.

Step 42: some things can't be fixed immediately. No matter how hard it is, sometimes you just have to be patient and deal with the situation as it stands. Do the best you can with what you have.
Tags: cycling, patience, transition
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